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City of calgary landscape design standards

City of calgary landscape design standards


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City of calgary landscape design standards calgary city approved a landscaping policy on september 20, 2014

The City of Calgary works diligently to protect the public’s health, safety and welfare, and encourage the well-being of all residents and visitors. The City is committed to providing safe and attractive spaces that will minimize risk to residents, provide for a pleasant and inviting public realm and have a positive and positive impact on our urban environment. Our policy is designed to meet the City’s purpose.

The Council may recommend to the next Municipal Government regarding the adoption of guidelines, principles, bylaws or policies to which owners, occupants, developers, contractors, designers, architects, developers or managers of any site or any project, commercial, industrial, industrial, residential or recreational use or undertaking shall comply.

The design and construction of public spaces shall be carried out to meet the following standards:

STANDARDS OF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

1. BACKGROUND

2. TYPES OF SPACES

3. DECORATIVE

4. INFORMATION

5. MULTI-LANGUAGE

6. NATURAL

7. SEASONAL

8. TEMPERATE

9. TRANSPARENT

10. COLOUR

11. IMMERSION

12. DESIGN ORGANIZATION

1. BACKGROUND

The purpose of this section is to provide a brief overview of City-owned and maintained parks, play areas, squares and green spaces and open space, as well as the dedicated, legal public open spaces within the Calgary Urban Area (CUA).

The CUA is the geographic region located within the City of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, bounded on the north by the TransCanada Highway, on the east by the Bow River, on the south by the CPR Line and on the west by the North Saskatchewan River. The City owns more than 42 hectares of land within the CUA, in addition to more than 37,000 square metres of land dedicated to park and open space. The land areas of park and open space in the City are not limited to park areas which are within the City’s boundaries. In addition to the land areas, the City owns the surrounding lake, creek, brook and streams and the urban watershed.

2. TYPES OF SPACES

The land areas and City owned areas which are established for use as parks, play areas, squares, green spaces and open space fall into two categories: the core land area and the lands surrounding the core area. These lands are maintained for the provision of:

access to these spaces and related activities, and

recreational and conservation purposes.

The City uses a linear system of parks, play areas, squares and green spaces, referred to as the parks, play areas, squares and green spaces framework, to determine the location and shape of the lands dedicated to these spaces. These parks, play areas, squares and green spaces framework lands are used to determine the areas of park and open space.

There are also dedicated, legal public open spaces within the City. The City’s planning, property development and legal authorities determine where, and the area covered, of such spaces.

3. DECORATIVE

Aesthetics are generally acknowledged to be a means of a positive influence in society. An excellent or attractive environment is a productive and resourceful environment.

Design plays an important role in the creation of good parks, play areas, squares and green spaces. Design enhances the recreational and cultural value of these spaces and contributes to the character of the City. An attractive environment encourages people to be active and encourages maintenance of the environment. A careful design enhances the quality of the natural setting for healthy living and can contribute to the aesthetic quality of the City’s urban environment.

Good design is a creative and challenging task and the desire for good design has long been acknowledged by City Council. The Alberta Association of Architects has adopted the following guidelines to define good design:

Providing accessibility

Enhancing the environment

Making the most of resources

Enhancing the quality of life

Being a good neighbour

Enabling people to participate fully in recreational activities

Encouraging interest, communication and understanding

Using good design makes good cities. Good cities are created with good design, with well-designed parks, play areas, squares and green spaces.

Key principles in good design include:

Restraint

The desire for good design is not indulgence. Good design is healthy, open-ended, is creative and is challenging. Inadequate or superficial design can serve only to destroy the space. Parks and open space are never good if they become overcrowded, or fenced off.People need space for exercise, play and relaxation. Fenced in or blocked off parks and open space can create the conditions which



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