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Commercial horticulture in rural tanzania

Commercial horticulture in rural tanzania



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Official websites use. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites. This is a best prospect industry sector for this country. Includes a market overview and trade data.

Content:
  • In Tanzania, Farmers Reap the Benefits of Radio
  • Innocent John Mbele
  • Winning in Africa’s agricultural market
  • Join Our Exciting Journey
  • Youths' participation in agricultural intensification in Tanzania
  • Helping poor Zanzibar farming communities benefit from tourism
  • Involution and Enterprise in Rural Areas
  • Smallholder Horticulture Outgrower Promotion (SHOP)
  • Emerging Tanzanian Leaders Address Food Security Challenges
  • Tanzania targets $3 billion in horticulture exports by 2025
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: AGRICULTURE, INVEST IN TANZANIA

In Tanzania, Farmers Reap the Benefits of Radio

The vast majority of those farming seaweed on the shores of Zanzibar are women. It is difficult labor that involves long hours in the water and heavy burdens. And, as water temperatures rise, people are forced to work farther and farther from land.

The occupation has offered an economic benefit to many women and youth in Tanzania, who have been able to support their households with the income generated from selling their products to the market. With the seaweed industry a global business, a new partnership between the Enhanced Integrated Framework EIF and the United Nations Development Programme UNDP is targeting this sector, along with four other agri-business value chains in the country, that can bring a host of benefits to women and youth through trade development.

With the goal to boost incomes and the national economy, five selected value chains were identified from recent analysis that could have the biggest impact on the livelihoods of the country's rural population, focusing specifically on women and youth.

These include honey, palm products, horticulture, seaweed and anchovies. More accessible and competitive markets at domestic, regional and international level can serve to alleviate poverty, as well as having a host of wider benefits for sustainable economic growth. Well-functioning markets stimulate investment and encourage small businesses to innovate, reduce costs, and create employment. Looking at demand in the Middle East, Asia and Europe, as well as what was happening with regional markets, analysis uncovered what Tanzania could offer.

Baseline surveys were completed for the sectors, and a plan put in place to set out how the project could best support those working in them. As a least developed country, the Government of Tanzania has partnered with EIF for more than a decade as the country strives to boost its trade. Horticulture is the fastest growing subsector within the Tanzanian agricultural sector, with an annual average growth of around 11 per cent. This growth is more than double the overall growth rate of the agriculture sector.

The subsector is also a major employer in Tanzania, providing jobs for around 4. The earlier UNDP project addressed issues from productivity , to enabling the business environment, to technological advancement and market access to financing. Extension officers helped women increase productivity through the use of drip irrigation and monitoring soil health. Providing technical assistance is a necessary element of the work. This includes getting the right research into the hands of those in government, including the Ministry of Industry and Trade.

The project is developing an ecommerce framework and strategy for Tanzania, as the country lays the foundations for a digital economy. It is hoped that additional resources to support small businesses comes in as these efforts progress. Tanzania is expected to ratify the African Continental Free Trade Agreement AfCFTA later this year, and the partnership is developing an analysis to address how the country can best position itself amid this new opportunity.

The study undertaken will focus on in-depth cost-benefits analysis of the AfCFTA and the market access opportunities for Tanzania. Any views and opinions expressed on Trade for Development News are those of the author s , and do not necessarily reflect those of EIF.

This means you are welcome to adapt, copy and share it on your platforms with attribution to the source and author s , but not for commercial purposes. If you would like to reuse any material published here, please let us know by sending an email to EIF Communications: eifcommunications wto.September 14,MSMEs Ecommerce. New project focusing on selected value chains from seaweed to honey The vast majority of those farming seaweed on the shores of Zanzibar are women.

UNDP has also recently concluded work that focused on horticulture in the country. September 21, Women-run businesses getting a boost in Rwanda and Zambia. September 07, In Lesotho, looking to expand from farming. August 03, Where's the money in shea?


Innocent John Mbele

Description of cropping systems, climate, and soils in Tanzania by Dr. Tanzania excluding the islands of Zanzibar has a total land area of , km 2 including 61, km 2 of inland water. Tanzania is the world's 31st-largest country and the 13th largest in Africa. Compared with other African countries, it is slightly smaller than Egypt and slightly larger than Nigeria. According to the census, total population was 45 millionOf this total, the under age group represents 44 percen PHC,

This overview of the agricultural extension system in Tanzania is part of the World Wide and pass on commercial activities to the private sector.

Winning in Africa’s agricultural market

The vast majority of those farming seaweed on the shores of Zanzibar are women. It is difficult labor that involves long hours in the water and heavy burdens. And, as water temperatures rise, people are forced to work farther and farther from land. The occupation has offered an economic benefit to many women and youth in Tanzania, who have been able to support their households with the income generated from selling their products to the market. With the seaweed industry a global business, a new partnership between the Enhanced Integrated Framework EIF and the United Nations Development Programme UNDP is targeting this sector, along with four other agri-business value chains in the country, that can bring a host of benefits to women and youth through trade development. With the goal to boost incomes and the national economy, five selected value chains were identified from recent analysis that could have the biggest impact on the livelihoods of the country's rural population, focusing specifically on women and youth. These include honey, palm products, horticulture, seaweed and anchovies. More accessible and competitive markets at domestic, regional and international level can serve to alleviate poverty, as well as having a host of wider benefits for sustainable economic growth. Well-functioning markets stimulate investment and encourage small businesses to innovate, reduce costs, and create employment. Looking at demand in the Middle East, Asia and Europe, as well as what was happening with regional markets, analysis uncovered what Tanzania could offer.

Join Our Exciting Journey

Putting capital in its place: globalization and the prospects for labor. Authors: Walker, RA. Citation: Ra. Markets, social embeddedness and precapitalist societies: the case of village tradestores in Papua New Guinea. Authors: Curry, G.

Agriculture in Africa has a massive social and economic footprint. In a recent analysis, we determined that Africa could produce two to three times more cereals and grains Exhibit 1 , which would add 20 percent more cereals and grains to the current worldwide 2.

Youths' participation in agricultural intensification in Tanzania

Key investments include advancing trade in important crops through improved rural infrastructure and value chain efficiency, making improvements in agricultural productivity, increasing market access through rural roads to reduce postharvest loss , enhancing the nutritional status of mothers and children, and building public and private sector capacity to address policy constraints. The full list of specific activities FtF is involved in can be accessed here. The Lab for Integrated Pest Management has a number of projects in Tanzania, one of which focuses on improving productivity of high value horticultural crops. The Lab for Grain Legumes focuses specifically on value-chain performance through improving understanding of consumer behavior. The Lab for Market Access has a project that looks at institutional reform in small-scale fisheries in Tanzania; another project in the Lab evaluates the impact of site-specific soil information on farmer decision-making.

Helping poor Zanzibar farming communities benefit from tourism

Poor and marginalised farmers in Zanzibar are producing better quality products, more competitively, in order to earn a greater income, through the " C ommercial A griculture for S mallholder Farmers in H orticulture" CASH project. These farmers are too dependent on erratic rainfall, and their resources and knowledge too limited, to be able to provide a consistent supply of quality fruit and vegetables.In , VSO volunteers from Tanzania and the UK completed an analysis of the fruit and vegetable value chain in Zanzibar to help these smallholder farmers understand how to derive a reliable income from farming. This analysis led to the creation of the CASH project, designed to:. Sada Juma, who has received training in business skills from a VSO volunteer to help her access the growing tourism market in Zanzibar. These farmers are then trained to spread the training to even more smallholders. Farmer Umbrella Organisations work to create networks of farmers that create greater overall capacity to meet hotel and restaurant demands, strengthen the national position of smallholders, protect them from market shocks and negotiate prices.

Mbale and Mbeya towns act as outlets for local agricultural products and as Since the s, Uganda and Tanzania have experienced several structural.

Involution and Enterprise in Rural Areas

Anyone can see the huge potential that Tanzania has to produce tea, coffee, fruits, and vegetables. Yet production is struggling and quality is uneven. The high number of small farming families that want to live from this activity are struggling to make ends meet. This is not unique to Tanzania; we see the same in most developing countries.

Smallholder Horticulture Outgrower Promotion (SHOP)

RELATED VIDEO: Tanzanian farmer's $50,000 investment yields profits in greenhouse farming

Our mission is to increase the productivity of farming in Tanzania and hence improve food security and nutrition and help reduce rural poverty. We do this by running a commercial farm which serves as a beacon for best practice agriculture in Tanzania. In parallel, we work every day to spread best practice throughout the farming community. FFF has the strong support of the Tanzanian government.

The industry is dominated by smallholder farmers with less than 2 hectares of land.

Emerging Tanzanian Leaders Address Food Security Challenges

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Tanzania targets $3 billion in horticulture exports by 2025

The increase in population as well as rapid urban growth and rising urban-rural movements bring new urban-rural dynamics and modes of integration in mountain regions. Since the collapse of traditional cash crops, mainly coffee, mountain agriculture has shifted to other profitable products. This shift has been in response to the increasing food demand from urban areas, at the local, national and even international levels. Vegetables, for example, have become both a food and cash crop.


Watch the video: Meet Naomi, an indigenous Vegetable Kenyan Farmer. How to start vegetable farming at home (August 2022).